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Academical Year 2007-2008

Easter Term, 2008

A Book to Save Society: al-Jahiz's Book of Living Creatures

Wednesday, 17th November, 2010 at 6:00pm in the Runcie Room
at the Faculty of Divinity, West Road, Cambridge.

A Cambridge Muslim College Public Lecture

To be given by Prof. James Montgomery, Department of Middle Eastern Studies.


Asian Studies Centre Seminar Series - Easter Term, 2008

The University of Cambridge Department of East Asian Studies is pleased to announce the programme for its Easter Term series of Asian Studies Centre seminars.

Unless otherwise noted, all seminars start at 5.00pm and take place in the Common Room of the Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies (formerly Oriental Studies), Sidgwick Avenue, Cambridge.

ALL ARE WELCOME

  • Wednesday, 23rd April, 2008
    (please note: this seminar is in addition to the regular sequence of Mondays)
    Between the Boudoir and the Global Market: Shen Shou (1874-1921), Embroidery and Modernity in China
    Dr Dorothy Ko, Barnard College, Columbia University
  • Monday, 5th May, 2008
    Angry merchants and impecunious government: understanding guild commerce in 19th century Korea
    Dr Owen Miller, School of Oriental & African Studies, University of London
  • Wednesday, 7th May, 2008
    (please note: this seminar is in addition to the regular sequence of Mondays)
    The 2008 Elections in Taiwan's Democratic Development
    Dr Shelley Rigger, Davidson College (USA)
  • Monday, 12th May, 2008
    Mobilization of Emotions under Mao: The Maoist Discourses and Its Propagation
    Dr Liu Yu, University of Cambridge
  • Tuesday, 13th May, 2008
    Thursday, 15th May, 2008
    Chuan Lyu Lectures, 2008
    Dr Margaret Hillenbrand, School of Oriental & African Studies, University of London
  • Monday, 19th May, 2008
    From Warriors to Sportsmen: How Traditional Chinese Martial Arts Adapted to Modernity
    Dr Kai Filipak, University of Leipzig
  • Monday, 26th May, 2008
    Human Rights and Japan - the intersection
    Professor Ian Neary, University of Oxford
  • Saturday, 31st May, 2008 - 2-6pm
    Conference: How the East Asia Media Debates the Asian Past in the Present

For further information, contact:

Dr John Swenson-Wright
Lecturer in Japanese Politics and International Relations
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies
Telephone: +44(0)1223 335152
Email: jhs22@cam.ac.uk

Barak Kushner, PhD
Lecturer in Modern Japanese History
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies
Telephone: +44(0)1223 335174
Email: bk284@cam.ac.uk

 

Call for Papers - Omar Khayyam, Edward FitzGerald and The Rubaiyat

6th - 10th July, 2009

"And, strange to tell, among that earthen Lot
Some could articulate, while others not:
And suddenly one more impatient cried-
'Who is the Potter, pray, and who the pot?'"

This week-long conference to be held at Leyden and Cambridge celebrates the 200th anniversary of the birth of Edward FitzGerald (1809) and the 150th anniversary of the first publication of his famous Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam (1859).

2009 will be an opportunity to mark the unique achievements of this former Cambridge student (Trinity 1826-30) and his extraordinary contribution to world literature. The Rubaiyat, rather loosely based on the verses attributed to the eleventh-century Persian writer, Omar Khayyam, has become perhaps the most widely known poem in the world. It has been republished virtually every year from 1879 (the year of FitzGerald's fourth edition) to the present day, and translated into some eighty different languages.

In collaboration with the Persian Department at the University of Leyden (the Netherlands), we are organising a four-day conference which will examine both the life and work of Omar Khayyam (scientist, mathematician and astronomer) (in Leyden, 6th and 7th July 2009) and the life and work of the Victorian English author Edward FitzGerald (in Cambridge, 9th and 10th July 2009), with a particular emphasis on the impact of his Rubaiyat and the reception of the poem in different languages and literatures and on the illustrations of the numerous editions of the text.

The Cambridge part of the programme will include a lecture programme open to the public, with a key-note speaker and presentations by academics of international standing, concerned with both English and Persian literature. The event will be linked to an earlier exhibition at the University Library displaying copies of the relevant Persian manuscripts (please note: original manuscript material will not be included in this exhibition; Manuscripts Department material which is included will be represented by copies, for conservation reasons) and the papers of FitzGerald and his mentor and correspondent, Edward Cowell, subsequently Professor of Sanskrit in Cambridge.

Call for Papers:

This week-long conference to be held at both venues celebrates the 200th anniversary of the birth of Edward FitzGerald and the150th anniversary of the first publication of his famous Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam.

We invite the participation of those interested, and the submission of abstracts for consideration by the conference organisers. The deadline is 1st August 2008.

The first half of the conference, in Leyden (6 and 7 July 2009), will concentrate on Omar Khayyam's life and work, as a scientist, scholar and poet, the genre of the rubai and the musical settings of his rubaiyat.

Leiden website: www.tcmo.leidenuniv.nl/index.php3?c=584

For participation in the Leyden half of the conference, please send your abstract to Dr Asghar Seyed-Gohrab, A.A.Seyed-Gohrab@let.leidenuniv.nl.

The second half of the conference, in Cambridge (9 and 10th July 2009), will concentrate on FitzGerald's work, especially The Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam, and other European translations of Khayyam's rubaiyat, on their impact on European literature and 'Orientalism', on the publication history of the translations and the illustrations of the quatrains.

For participation in the Cambridge half of the conference, please send your abstract to Dr Christine van Ruymbeke, cv223@cam.ac.uk.


External Conference:

Journalism Testing Legal Boundaries: Media Laws and the Reporting of Arab News, 20th June 2008, University of Westminster.


Palestine Variations: Contrapuntal Themes in History, Religion, and Culture

Saturday, 24th May, 2008
Keynes Hall, King's College, University of Cambridge

Convener: Dr Lori Allen
Department of Middle Eastern Studies, University of Cambridge


Lent Term, 2008 

Israeli Film Club - Lent Term 2008

Israeli films are shown every Monday from 1:15pm in room L1 (basement lecture theatre), Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies, Sidgwick Avenue.

ALL ARE WELCOME

All films are Israeli and are in Hebrew with English subtitles.

"The Israeli Army (IDF) in the Israeli cinema"

28 January
Operation Entebbe ("mivtsa yonatan")
Menahem Golan, 1977 (124 mins)
4 February
Avanti Popolo
Rafi Bukee, 1986 (90 mins)
11 February
Late Summer Blues ("blues Lahofesh ha’gadol")
Renen Schorr, 1987 (97 mins)
18 February
One of Us
Uri Barbash, 1989 (106 mins)
25 February
Yossi & Jagger
Eytan Fox, 2002 (67 mins)
3 March
Close to Home
Vidi Bilu & Dalya Hager, 2005 (100 mins)
10 March
Beaufort
Joseph Cedar, 2007 (125 mins)

 


Centre for Modern Hebrew Studies Lecture -
The Jewish Magical Texts from the Cairo Genizah

Wednesday, 23rd January, 2008 at 5pm in Room 8
at the Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies, Sidgwick Avenue, Cambridge

The University of Cambridge Centre for Modern Hebrew Studies presents a lecture:

The Jewish Magical Texts from the Cairo Genizah

To be given by: Dr Gideon Bohak, Department of Jewish Culture, Tel-Aviv University

Dr Bohak wrote his Ph.D. in Princeton in 1994, and wrote a book on a Jewish-Hellenistic novel called Joseph and Aseneth. In the last few years he has been working on Jewish magic and his book Ancient Jewish Magic is forthcoming soon with Cambridge University Press. He is now on sabbatical in Cambridge and studying the magical texts found among the Cairo Geniziah fragments in the Taylor-Schechter Collection of the Cambridge University Library.

ALL ARE WELCOME

For further information contact:

Mrs Rachel Williams
Centre for Modern Hebrew Studies
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies
Telephone: +44(0)1223-335134
Email: rw212@cam.ac.uk


Centre for Modern Hebrew Studies Talk - Eshkol Nevo: Homesick in Cambridge

Tuesday, 26th February, 2008 at 5pm in Room 8 at the
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies, Sidgwick Avenue, Cambridge

To be given by: Eshkol Nevo, Israeli Novelist

Eshkol Nevo talks about his new novel "Homesick" and about Israel as a Troublesome Home.

ALL ARE WELCOME

For further information contact:

Mrs Rachel Williams
Centre for Modern Hebrew Studies
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies
Telephone: +44(0)1223-335134
Email: rw212@cam.ac.uk


Centre for Modern Hebrew Studies Lecture - Two States for Two Peoples? The Zionist Opposition to Partition in 1947

Wednesday, 20th February, 2008 at 5pm in Room 8 at the
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies, Sidgwick Avenue, Cambridge

The University of Cambridge Centre for Modern Hebrew Studies presents a lecture:

Two States for Two Peoples? The Zionist Opposition to Partition in 1947

To be given by: Dr Colin Shindler, School of Oriental & African Studies, University of London

ALL ARE WELCOME

For further information contact:

Mrs Rachel Williams
Centre for Modern Hebrew Studies
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies
Telephone: +44(0)1223-335134
Email: rw212@cam.ac.uk


China Research Workshop for Graduate Students

Tuesday, 22nd & Wednesday, 23rd April, 2008
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies, Sidgwick Avenue, Cambridge

The University of Cambridge Department of East Asian Studies presents:

China Research Workshop

Organized by Dr Anna Boermel & Dr Thomas Jansen, University of Cambridge

We warmly invite graduate students working on China, based both in the UK and continental Europe, to a two-day workshop to be held on 22-23 April 2008 in Cambridge.

The workshop has the following objectives:

  • to create a forum for subject-specific and generic research training for doctoral students under the guidance of specialists in a wide range of fields;
  • to assist research students in forging academic networks with their peers as well as with senior academics;
  • to help graduate students acquire transferable skills essential to an academic career and to offer an opportunity to present work-in-progress in a stimulating setting

The first day of the workshop will be dedicated to two topics of crucial importance to scholars in the early stages of their career:

1. Academic publishing
2. Research funding

On the second day faculty of the Department of East Asian Studies will run subject-specific study groups. Participants are expected to present and discuss their work-in-progress. The following study groups will be offered:

  • Early China
  • Six Dynasties
  • Social and Economic History of China (1000-1700 AD)
  • Modern History
  • Literature/Film/Cultural Studies
  • Anthropology/ Sociology
  • Political Science

For further information, contact:

Dr Thomas Jansen
Lecturer in Classical Chinese Studies
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies
Telephone: +44(0)1223 335148
Email: tj240@cam.ac.uk

Dr Anna Boermel
Teaching fellow in Contemporary Chinese Society
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies
Telephone: +44(0)1223 335145
Email: ab666@cam.ac.uk


Sandars Lectures 2008

Professor Peter Kornicki, of the University of Cambridge Department of East Asian Studies, will deliver the annual Sandars lectures this year. These three public lectures will be given on Monday 10th, Tuesday 11th and Thursday 13th March at 5pm in the Cambridge University Library. The lectures will be illustrated and, appropriately enough, no knowledge of Chinese is assumed! Some of the books used to illustrate the argument will be available for close examination after each lecture.

Professor Peter Kornicki is professor of East Asian studies at the University of Cambridge and honorary keeper of the Japanese books in the University Library. He inaugurated the project for a Union Catalogue of Early Japanese Books in Europe, which is now searchable online.

ALL ARE WELCOME

Monday, 10th March, 2008
The Latin of East Asia?
This will concern the circulation of Chinese books in East Asia in manuscript and print and the roles they played in societies linguistically unconnected with Chinese. Complementing the Silk Road, there was what has been termed a Book Road, which took Chinese Buddhist texts and canonical texts of the Confucian tradition to those distant parts of the East Asian world we now call Vietnam, Korea and Japan and other places. Understanding them, however, required a good knowledge of Chinese, which was not easily come by.

Tuesday, 11th March, 2008
Bluffing Your Way in Chinese
Chinese texts enjoyed enormous esteem outside China and were widely held to embody religious, ethical and political lessons that were worth disseminating, but learning classical Chinese was a daunting prospect and this difficulty was met by devising strategies for translation, adaptation and simplification using the vernacular languages, making it possible for Japanese, Koreans and Vietnamese to gain access to Chinese texts without actually having to learn the language.

Please note, there is no lecture on Wednesday, 12th!

Thursday, 13th March, 2008
"Little Chinese, less Manchu"
By the early twentieth century Chinese was effectively 'dead' as the international language of learning in East Asia. In this lecture we will consider the rise of the vernacular book and vernacular systems of knowledge outside China.

For further information, contact:

Prof. Peter Kornicki
Professor of East Asian studies
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies
Telephone: +44(0)1223 335173
Email: pk104@cam.ac.uk

 


Slippery Texts: A Third Misplaced Strip in the Bamboo Annals

Monday, 3rd March, 2008 at 5pm
Needham Research Institute, Sylvester Road, Cambridge

The University of Cambridge Department of East Asian Studies and the Needham Research Institute present:

Slippery Texts: A Third Misplaced Strip in the Bamboo Annals

To be given by: Professor Edward Shaughnessy, Lorraine J. and Herrlee G. Creel Distinguished Service Professor in Early Chinese Studies, University of Chicago

ALL ARE WELCOME

For further information, contact:

Prof. Roel Sterckx
Professor of Chinese
Department of East Asian Studies
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies
Telephone: +44(0)1223 335137
Email: rs10009@cam.ac.uk


Clare Hall Chinese Celebrations

 
Transitions and Translations: China, Modernity, and Translation, CRASSH
workshop, 13-14 March, 2008. Speakers include Lydia Liu and Haun Saussy

East Asia Institute Seminar Series - Lent Term, 2008

The University of Cambridge Department of East Asian Studies is pleased to announce the programme for its Lent Term series of East Asia Institute seminars.

The Seminar acknowledges with gratitude financial support from the Japanese Embassy.

The venue for all EAI Seminars until May (except the film show on 6th February) has been changed to Room 1.02 in the Faculty of Classics, Sidgwick Avenue, Cambridge.

The Faculty of Classics is directly adjacent to the Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies on the Sidgwick Avenue site. When facing the main entrance to the Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies, turn around and the building behind you is the Faculty of Classics. Enter the door diagonally to your right, the main entrance to the Faculty, and go immediately up the stairs. Room 1.02 is the large lecture theatre on your left at the top of the stairs.

The seminars will start at 5.00pm (except the film show on 6th February).

ALL ARE WELCOME

Monday, 21st January, 2008
Locality and Belonging in Early Ming China: The Tale of Lady Tan
Dr Anne Gerritsen, Warwick University

Wednesday, 23rd January, 2008
(please note: this seminar is in addition to the regular sequence of Mondays)
Poetry Untamed: A Postnationalist Approach to Ancient East Asian Literature
Dr Jason Webb, University of Tokyo

Monday, 28th January, 2008
Japan's Politics of Cultural Shame
Dr Tamamoto Masaru, Visiting Scholar, University of Cambridge

Tuesday, 29th January, 2008
(please note: this seminar is in addition to the regular sequence of Mondays) Paradise Lost: From Chollima Speed to Slow Motion Famine -
How North Korea Got Where it is Today
Mr Paul French, Access Asia, Shanghai

Monday, 4th February, 2008
South Korea To 2013: How Much Will Change?
Mr Aidan Foster-Carter, Leeds University

Wednesday, 6th February, 2008 at 4.30pm in the Winstanley Lecture Hall, Trinity College, Cambridge (please note: this seminar is in addition to the regular sequence of Mondays and has the special start time and location noted here) Crossing the Line
The story of Comrade Joe, the last American defector in North Korea...
Film screening followed by question and answer session with Nicholas Bonner (Co-producer), Very Much So Productions & Koryo Tours

Monday, 11th February, 2008
Freemasonry in East Asia - Focus on Japan
Miss Pauline Chakmakjian, University of Wales

Monday, 18th February, 2008
Korean Foreign Policy Initiative under the New Presidency
Dr Park Cheol Hee, Seoul National University

Monday, 25th February, 2008
China-Japan Relations in the Global Setting
Professor Jin Linbo, China Institute of International Studies, Beijing, China

Monday, 3rd March, 2008
Impact of Anglo-American institutions on the Japanese Business System
Mr Louis Turner, Chief Executive of the Asia-Pacific Technology Network

Wednesday, 5th March, 2008
(please note: this seminar is in addition to the regular sequence of Mondays)
Japan in the 21st Century
Professor Kitaoka Shinichi, University of Tokyo

Monday, 17th March, 2008
The Democratic Party of Japan:
On the rise or falling towards permanent opposition?

Dr Sarah Hyde, University of Kent

For further information, contact:

Dr John Swenson-Wright
Lecturer in Japanese Politics and International Relations
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies
Telephone: +44(0)1223 335152
Email: jhs22@cam.ac.uk

Barak Kushner, PhD
Lecturer in Modern Japanese History
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies
Telephone: +44(0)1223 335174
Email: bk284@cam.ac.uk


The Democratic Party of Japan:
On the rise or falling towards permanent opposition?

Monday, 17th March, 2008 at 5pm in the Common Room.

Please note that the seminar venue has been changed to: Room 1.02 in the Faculty of Classics, Sidgwick Avenue, Cambridge.

The Faculty of Classics is directly adjacent to the Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies on the Sidgwick Avenue site. When facing the main entrance to the Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies, turn around and the building behind you is the Faculty of Classics. Enter the door diagonally to your right, the main entrance to the Faculty, and go immediately up the stairs. Room 1.02 is the large lecture theatre on your left at the top of the stairs.

The University of Cambridge Department of East Asian Studies presents an East Asia Institute seminar:

The Democratic Party of Japan:
On the rise or falling towards permanent opposition?

To be given by: Dr Sarah Hyde, University of Kent

Dr. Hyde teaches politics and international relations at the University of Kent. She has long standing links with the prefecture of Okayama where she did her MA and in particular with veteran Diet Member, Eda Satsuki, Speaker of the House of Commons. As part of her doctorate she spent a year working for the Okayama Democratic Party of Japan election campaign. She returns to Japan most summers in order to meet with local and national level politicians. Sarah was Book Reviews Editor for the leading journal on Japan in the UK, Japan Forum and won a Faculty Teaching Prize in 2006. She published "The End Game of Socialism: from the JSP to the DJP," in David Williams and Rikki Kersten (eds), The Left in the Shaping of Japanese Democracy. London: Routledge, 2005. Her own research on Japanese politics is forthcoming from Routledge.

ALL ARE WELCOME

For further information, contact:

Dr John Swenson-Wright
Lecturer in Japanese Politics and International Relations
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies
Telephone: +44(0)1223 335152
Email: jhs22@cam.ac.uk

Barak Kushner, PhD
Lecturer in Modern Japanese History
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies
Telephone: +44(0)1223 335174
Email: bk284@cam.ac.uk


Impact of Anglo-American institutions on the Japanese Business System

Monday, 3rd March, 2008 at 5pm in the Common Room.

Please note that the seminar venue has been changed to: Room 1.02 in the Faculty of Classics, Sidgwick Avenue, Cambridge.

The Faculty of Classics is directly adjacent to the Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies on the Sidgwick Avenue site. Please see the map here for the exact location: building number 3 on the map is the Faculty of Classics (building number 6 is the Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies). When facing the main entrance to the Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies, turn around and the building behind you is the Faculty of Classics. Enter the door diagonally to your right, the main entrance to the Faculty, and go immediately up the stairs. Room 1.02 is the large lecture theatre on your left at the top of the stairs.

The University of Cambridge Department of East Asian Studies presents an East Asia Institute seminar:

Impact of Anglo-American institutions on the Japanese Business System

To be given by: Mr Louis Turner,
Chief Executive of the Asia-Pacific Technology Network

Louis Turner is Chief Executive, Asia-Pacific Technology Network and an Associate Fellow of Chatham House. He has written nine books on various aspects of the international business system, including Industrial Collaboration with Japan (London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1987) (foreword by Hiroshi Takeuchi: co-authors include Michael Hodges) and The British Research of Japanese Companies (Anglo-Japanese Economic Institute 1997) (with David Ray and Tony Hayward). Between 1986 and 2005, he ran 20 annual UK-Japanese High Technology Industry Forums with the Japan Economic Foundation. He is currently researching a Chatham House paper on Anglo-American influences on the Japanese Business System, and is starting a project on the History of Japanese Investment in the UK since 1990.

ALL ARE WELCOME

For further information, contact:

Dr John Swenson-Wright
Lecturer in Japanese Politics and International Relations
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies
Telephone: +44(0)1223 335152
Email: jhs22@cam.ac.uk

Barak Kushner, PhD
Lecturer in Modern Japanese History
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies
Telephone: +44(0)1223 335174
Email: bk284@cam.ac.uk


Japan in the 21st Century

Wednesday, 5th March, 2008 at 5pm in the Common Room.

Please note that the seminar venue has been changed to: Room 1.02 in the Faculty of Classics, Sidgwick Avenue, Cambridge.

The Faculty of Classics is directly adjacent to the Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies on the Sidgwick Avenue site. Please see the map here for the exact location: building number 3 on the map is the Faculty of Classics (building number 6 is the Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies). When facing the main entrance to the Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies, turn around and the building behind you is the Faculty of Classics. Enter the door diagonally to your right, the main entrance to the Faculty, and go immediately up the stairs. Room 1.02 is the large lecture theatre on your left at the top of the stairs.

The University of Cambridge Department of East Asian Studies presents an East Asia Institute seminar:

Japan in the 21st Century

To be given by: Professor Kitaoka Shinichi, University of Tokyo

Dr. Kitaoka Shin'ichi is Professor at the Faculty of Law at the University of Tokyo. He is an expert on Japanese political and diplomatic history. After receiving his PhD from the University of Tokyo in 1976, he began his academic career as a lecturer at Rikkyo University, where he became full professor in 1985. In 1997 he moved to a professorship in modern Japanese politics and diplomacy at the University of Tokyo's Graduate School of Law and Politics. Dr. Kitaoka has served as a member of the advisory panel to Prime Minister Miyazawa on "Japan and Asia Pacific in the 21st Century" (1992), as a member of Prime Minister Obuchi's Commission on "Japan's Goals in the 21s Century" (1999), and as a member of Prime Minister Koizumi's Task Force on Foreign Affairs (2001-2004). He was appointed deputy permanent representative of Japan to the United Nations in 2004 and served through the autumn of 2006. Dr. Kitaoka has received the Yoshino Sakuzo Prize, the Suntory Prize for Liberal Arts, the Yoshida Shigeru Prize, and the Yomiuri Prize as the Opinion Leader of the Year. His publications include Kokuren no Seijirikigaku: Nippon wa doko ni irunoka (The political dynamics of the UN: Japan's position, published in 2007), Dokuritsu jison: Fukuzawa Yukichi no chosen (Pride and self-dependence: the challenge of Fukuzawa Yukichi, 2002) and Futsu no kuni e (Toward a normal country, 2000).

ALL ARE WELCOME

For further information, contact:

Dr John Swenson-Wright
Lecturer in Japanese Politics and International Relations
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies
Telephone: +44(0)1223 335152
Email: jhs22@cam.ac.uk

Barak Kushner, PhD
Lecturer in Modern Japanese History
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies
Telephone: +44(0)1223 335174
Email: bk284@cam.ac.uk


China-Japan Relations in the Global Setting

Monday, 25th February, 2008 at 5pm in the Common Room.

Please note that the seminar venue has been changed to: Room 1.02 in the Faculty of Classics, Sidgwick Avenue, Cambridge.

The Faculty of Classics is directly adjacent to the Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies on the Sidgwick Avenue site. Please see the map here for the exact location: building number 3 on the map is the Faculty of Classics (building number 6 is the Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies). When facing the main entrance to the Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies, turn around and the building behind you is the Faculty of Classics. Enter the door diagonally to your right, the main entrance to the Faculty, and go immediately up the stairs. Room 1.02 is the large lecture theatre on your left at the top of the stairs.

The University of Cambridge Department of East Asian Studies presents an East Asia Institute seminar:

China-Japan Relations in the Global Setting

To be given by: Professor Jin Linbo, China Institute of International Studies, Beijing, China

Professor Jin Linbo is a Research Professor of China Institute of International Studies. He received his PhD in Political Science from Nagoya University, Japan in 1994. From 1995 to 1997 he was a Visiting Scholar at the Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies, Harvard University and a JSPS Invited Scholar at the Graduate School of Law, Kyoto University from 2001 to 2002. His research focuses on politics and foreign policy of both modern Japan and China, and International Relations in Northeast Asia. He has published many articles in Chinese and Japanese. His recent writings include: "Challenges and Opportunities for China-Japan Relations," China Review (Hong Kong), April, 2007; "North East Security and China's Role," Culture Exchange (Berlin), March, 2006; "North Korea Nuclear Issue and Six Party Talks," Collected Papers of Study on Korea (Beijing), June, 2005; "DPRK-Japan Relations and North East Asia Security," International Studies (Beijing), 2003; and "China eyes Japan 1868-2002," Seiji Keizai Horitsu Kenkyu (Tokyo), March 2002.

ALL ARE WELCOME

For further information, contact:

Dr John Swenson-Wright
Lecturer in Japanese Politics and International Relations
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies
Telephone: +44(0)1223 335152
Email: jhs22@cam.ac.uk

Barak Kushner, PhD
Lecturer in Modern Japanese History
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies
Telephone: +44(0)1223 335174
Email: bk284@cam.ac.uk


Korean Foreign Policy Initiative under the New Presidency

Monday, 18th February, 2008 at 5pm in the Common Room.

Please note that the seminar venue has been changed to: Room 1.02 in the Faculty of Classics, Sidgwick Avenue, Cambridge.

The Faculty of Classics is directly adjacent to the Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies on the Sidgwick Avenue site. Please see the map here for the exact location: building number 3 on the map is the Faculty of Classics (building number 6 is the Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies). When facing the main entrance to the Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies, turn around and the building behind you is the Faculty of Classics. Enter the door diagonally to your right, the main entrance to the Faculty, and go immediately up the stairs. Room 1.02 is the large lecture theatre on your left at the top of the stairs.

The University of Cambridge Department of East Asian Studies presents an East Asia Institute seminar:

Korean Foreign Policy Initiative under the New Presidency

To be given by: Dr Park Cheol Hee, Seoul National University

Dr. Park Cheol Hee is currently associate professor at the Graduate School of International Studies (GSIS) at Seoul National University (SNU), Korea. Before moving to SNU he was an assistant professor at the Institute of Foreign Affairs and National Security (IFANS) under the Korean Foreign Ministry. Between 1999 and 2002, he taught Japanese politics at the National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies (GRIPS) in Tokyo, Japan. Professor Park graduated from Seoul National University, where he received his BA and MA and obtained his Ph.D. at Columbia University. Dr. Park's major field of study is Japanese politics and diplomacy. His dissertation was on electoral strategies in urban Japan after the electoral reform, which was published in Japanese with the title of Daigishi no Tsukurare Kata (How the Japanese Dietman Is Made). He has penned many articles on Japanese politics, Korea-Japan relations and international relations in East Asia. Dr. Park frequently comments on Korea-Japan relations and international relations in East Asia in major newspapers, including Chosun Ilbo, Joongang Ilbo, Yomiuri Shimbun, Asahi Shimbun and on NHK. In recognition of his academic achievement and practical contribution to improving Korea-Japan relations, Dr. Park was awarded the First Nakasone Yasuhiro Award in June 2005.

ALL ARE WELCOME

For further information, contact:

Dr John Swenson-Wright
Lecturer in Japanese Politics and International Relations
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies
Telephone: +44(0)1223 335152
Email: jhs22@cam.ac.uk

Barak Kushner, PhD
Lecturer in Modern Japanese History
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies
Telephone: +44(0)1223 335174
Email: bk284@cam.ac.uk


Freemasonry in East Asia - Focus on Japan

Monday, 11th February, 2008 at 5pm.

Please note that the seminar venue has been changed to: Room 1.02 in the Faculty of Classics, Sidgwick Avenue, Cambridge.

The Faculty of Classics is directly adjacent to the Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies on the Sidgwick Avenue site. Please see the map here for the exact location: building number 3 on the map is the Faculty of Classics (building number 6 is the Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies). When facing the main entrance to the Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies, turn around and the building behind you is the Faculty of Classics. Enter the door diagonally to your right, the main entrance to the Faculty, and go immediately up the stairs. Room 1.02 is the large lecture theatre on your left at the top of the stairs.

The University of Cambridge Department of East Asian Studies presents an East Asia Institute seminar:

Freemasonry in East Asia - Focus on Japan

To be given by: Miss Pauline Chakmakjian, University of Wales

Miss Pauline Chakmakjian gives public lectures on occidental and oriental Freemasonry with a particular interest in eighteenth-century British and European salon culture and contemporary Japanese Freemasonry in relation to Japanese ritual and religion. She completed a BA in English Language and Literature (Whittier), was awarded a fine art merit scholarship in drawing and painting during her undergraduate studies, and also holds a postgraduate diploma in Law (London) as well as a MA in Modern French Studies (London). In 2006, Pauline founded The Japan Room, which meets in Lodge Room No. 11 (named after Japan) of the Freemasons' Hall in central London, with the two-fold aim of informing the public about Anglo-Japanese Masonic connections in a masonic context and to promote the culture of Japan. Pauline is completing her doctoral studies at the University of Wales, Lampeter.

ALL ARE WELCOME

For further information, contact:

Dr John Swenson-Wright
Lecturer in Japanese Politics and International Relations
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies
Telephone: +44(0)1223 335152
Email: jhs22@cam.ac.uk

Barak Kushner, PhD
Lecturer in Modern Japanese History
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies
Telephone: +44(0)1223 335174
Email: bk284@cam.ac.uk


South Korea To 2013: How Much Will Change?

Monday, 4th February, 2008 at 5pm.

Please note that the seminar venue has been changed to: Room 1.02 in the Faculty of Classics, Sidgwick Avenue, Cambridge.

The Faculty of Classics is directly adjacent to the Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies on the Sidgwick Avenue site. When facing the main entrance to the Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies, turn around and the building behind you is the Faculty of Classics. Enter the door diagonally to your right, the main entrance to the Faculty, and go immediately up the stairs. Room 1.02 is the large lecture theatre on your left at the top of the stairs.

The University of Cambridge Department of East Asian Studies presents an East Asia Institute seminar:

South Korea To 2013: How Much Will Change?

To be given by: Mr Aidan Foster-Carter, Leeds University

Mr. Aidan Foster-Carter is honorary senior research fellow in sociology and modern Korea at Leeds University. His Korean interests began in 1968, inspired by development studies and juvenile Kimilsungism. Having taught sociology in Hull, Dar es Salaam, and (mainly) Leeds for 22 years, in 1993 he became a full-time Korea analyst and consultant, serving academic, business and policy audiences in the UK and worldwide. He writes regularly on Korea for, among others: the Economist Intelligence Unit, Oxford Analytica, Asia Intelligence, IDEA global, New Nations and Pacific Forum CSIS. His latest venture, since October 2007, is a monthly Korea Focus, published by Menas Associates. He has made over 20 visits to the peninsula, including two to North Korea. His ambitions are to read more Korean lyric poetry, and to travel by train from Pusan to Paris.

ALL ARE WELCOME

For further information, contact:

Dr John Swenson-Wright
Lecturer in Japanese Politics and International Relations
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies
Telephone: +44(0)1223 335152
Email: jhs22@cam.ac.uk

Barak Kushner, PhD
Lecturer in Modern Japanese History
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies
Telephone: +44(0)1223 335174
Email: bk284@cam.ac.uk


Crossing the Line -
The story of Comrade Joe, the last American defector in North Korea...

Wednesday, 6th February, 2008 at 4.30pm.

Please note that the venue for this event is the Winstanley Lecture Hall, Trinity College, Cambridge.

Directions and signs on how to reach the Winstanley theatre will be provided on 6th February at the main Porter's lodge at Trinity College. However, the following two maps also provide details on how to find the Winstanley Theatre.

Please note, the programme starts at 4.30pm and is likely to be well attended. Come early to be assured of a seat.

The University of Cambridge Department of East Asian Studies presents an East Asia Institute seminar and film screening of:

Crossing the Line
The story of Comrade Joe, the last American defector in North Korea...

a feature documentary
Directed and Produced by Daniel Gordon
Co-Produced by Nicholas Bonner
Narrated by Christian Slater

To be followed by a Question and Answer session with the Co-Producer:

Nicholas Bonner
Very Much So Productions & Koryo Tours

SYNOPSIS
In 1962, a U.S. soldier sent to guard the peace in South Korea deserted his unit, walked across the most heavily fortified area on earth and defected to the Cold War enemy, the communist state of North Korea. He became a coveted star of the North Korean propaganda machine, but then disappeared from the face of the known world. He later found fame acting in North Korean films, typecast as an evil American. He uses Korean as his daily language. He has three sons from two wives. He has lived in North Korea twice as long as he has in America. At one time, there were four Americans living in North Korea. Today, just one remains. Now, after 45 years, the story of Comrade Joe, the last American defector in North Korea, is told for the first time...

This is the story of the last American defector in North Korea, James Joseph Dresnok. It's a story of defection, kidnap, love, and political intrigue, all set and captured in the most secret and inaccessible country on earth: North Korea. In the 1960s, at the height of the Cold War, four US soldiers defected to North Korea. None of the men had any idea what awaited them on the other side. No one knows why they defected, until now. Each man left his Southern border post in the demilitarised zone - the DMZ, a 2.5 mile wide patch of land that splits the Korean peninsula in half and is the most heavily fortified area on earth, packed with 2.5m land mines-and walked into an alien world. Dresnok and his unique band of brothers published propaganda pamphlets, telling the world how happy they were in 'the People's Paradise' and starred in propaganda films, vilifying US servicemen. They became North Korean national heroes. The world knows of only one of these men: Charles Robert Jenkins. His story broke open in September 2002 when it was reported that one of the kidnapped Japanese nationals, Hitomi Soga, had married an American defector. What no one knew at that time, except for the filmmakers, was that a second American defector, James Joseph Dresnok, was alive. Jenkins now lives in Japan with his wife and daughters. He is a key part of the story but as much of it is now in the public domain, it is Dresnok who is the driving force of the film. Dresnok remains in North Korea and lives with his family in the capital city, Pyongyang, and has not had contact with outsiders since his defection in 1962. Dresnok grew up a poor orphan in Virginia, and never finished high school. He had little choice but go to the army when after a first stint in West Germany, he was sent over to the most dangerous border in the world, the DMZ. Dresnok has now lived for 44 years in Pyongyang, capital city of North Korea, one of the most deeply anti-American societies in the world. He worked for the Korean People's Army as an English teacher, learned the language and the system. For the first time, Dresnok tells his story. In making the film, the filmmakers had astonishing access to Dresnok, his daily life in North Korea, his and the other defector families, and even the North Korean soldier who captured him in 1962. These sights have never been seen before to anyone outside North Korea, and even to most North Koreans.

NICK BONNER (CO-PRODUCER)
In 2000, Bonner along with his fellow producer and director Dan Gorden, stopped all other commitments to make the film that they had been told could not be made: the story of the North Korean World Cup team of 1966, THE GAME OF THEIR LIVES. Bonner has worked with VeryMuchSo Productions as Associate Producer and a North Korean specialist on both THE GAME OF THEIR LIVES and A STATE OF THEIR MIND. Since 1993, Bonner has been based in China and has visited North Korea more than any other westerner. Bonner is the Director of Koryo Tours, which is now in its fourteenth year and expert in travel, cultural and educational exchanges in North Korea. He has worked on various projects that have helped open North Korea to the outside world but none more challenging than the films made in conjunction with VeryMuchSo Productions. Together, they brought the players of the 1966 North Korean World Cup team back to Britain in 2002, North Korea's biggest cultural exchange with the West. During the 3 week tour, the players were lauded by 120,000 football fans at four different matches.

ALL ARE WELCOME

For further information, contact:

Dr John Swenson-Wright
Lecturer in Japanese Politics and International Relations
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies
Telephone: +44(0)1223 335152
Email: jhs22@cam.ac.uk

Barak Kushner, PhD
Lecturer in Modern Japanese History
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies
Telephone: +44(0)1223 335174
Email: bk284@cam.ac.uk


Revisiting the Monumental Canon-in-Translation of
Three European Sinological Stars

Thursday, 31st January, 2008 at 5pm in Room 13
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies, Sidgwick Avenue, Cambridge

The University of Cambridge Department of East Asian Studies presents:

Revisiting the Monumental Canon-in-Translation of
Three European Sinological Stars:

James Legge (1815-1897), Seraphin Couvreur (1835-1919)
and Richard Wilhelm (1873-1930)

To be given by: Professor Lauren Pfister, Department of Religion and Philosophy, Hong Kong Baptist University

Prof. Pfister is a specialist in the fields of Chinese and comparative philosophy and religion, in particular the history of Christian missions in China. Among his numerous publications are Striving for 'The Whole Duty of Man': James Legge (1815-1897) and the Scottish Protestant Encounter with China (2004; winner of the "Outstanding Books of 2004 for Mission Studies" award) and an edited volume entitled Hermeneutical Thinking in Chinese Philosophy (2006).

ALL ARE WELCOME

For further information, contact:

Dr Thomas Jansen
Lecturer in Classical Chinese Studies
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies
Telephone: +44(0)1223 335148
Email: tj240@cam.ac.uk


Paradise Lost: From Chollima Speed to Slow Motion Famine -
How North Korea Got Where it is Today

Tuesday, 29th January, 2008 at 5pm in the Common Room,
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies, Sidgwick Avenue, Cambridge.

The University of Cambridge Department of East Asian Studies presents an East Asia Institute seminar:

Paradise Lost: From Chollima Speed to Slow Motion Famine -
How North Korea Got Where it is Today

To be given by: Mr Paul French, Access Asia, Shanghai

From one of the world's 20 largest economies in 1975 to an estimated two million dead from famine twenty years later and then to the world's most isolated and little understood nuclear power. How did North Korea manage to so spectacularly mismanage its economy, manage its people, seal its borders and get the bomb? Paul French, the author of North Korea: Paranoid Peninsula - A Modern History (Zed Books, London, 2005) details the rise, fall and dynamics of North Korea's economy, society and political leadership and the likelihood of future change.

Since the breakthrough agreement between North Korea and the USA in February 2007 it appears that the nuclear crisis on the Korean peninsula has some forward motion at last. However, while the nuclear threat is being tackled North Korea itself remains in a state of advanced economic collapse, food shortages and political ossification. The talk will include a round up of the current state of North Korea's economy, the possibilities of economic liberalisation and the current views from Washington, Pyongyang and Beijing on the DPRK.

Paul French is a founder and the Chief China Representative of Access Asia based in Shanghai. Founded ten years ago, Access Asia specializes in providing information on China's economy and consumer/retail markets. He is also a contributor to the China Economic Quarterly and the China Editor of Ethical Corporation Magazine. French is also a member of the board of international advisors for the North Korea Investibility Index (NKII). He studied Chinese and Asian studies at the University of London and socialist theories and movements at the University of Glasgow.

French was the co-author of the 1998 book One Billion Shoppers: Accessing Asia's Consuming Passions and also the author of North Korea The Paranoid Peninsula (2005) and A Tough Old China Hand - The Life, Times and Adventures of an American in Shanghai (2006) - a biography of the legendary Shanghai based journalist and ad man from the 1930s. His next book - Fat China: How Expanding Waistlines Will Change a Nation - will be published in 2008.

ALL ARE WELCOME

For further information, contact:

Dr John Swenson-Wright
Lecturer in Japanese Politics and International Relations
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies
Telephone: +44(0)1223 335152
Email: jhs22@cam.ac.uk

Barak Kushner, PhD
Lecturer in Modern Japanese History
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies
Telephone: +44(0)1223 335174
Email: bk284@cam.ac.uk


Japan's Politics of Cultural Shame

Monday, 28th January, 2008 at 5pm in the Common Room, Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies, Sidgwick Avenue, Cambridge.

The University of Cambridge Department of East Asian Studies presents an East Asia Institute seminar:

Japan's Politics of Cultural Shame

To be given by: Dr Tamamoto Masaru, Visiting Scholar, University of Cambridge

Dr. Tamamoto writes on Japanese national identity and international relations. His essays have appeared in Daedalus, Far Eastern Economic Review, World Policy Journal andthe New York Times, among others. His recent essays include "How Japan Imagines China and Sees Itself" in World Policy Journal and "Japan's Politics of Cultural Shame" in Global Asia. Formerly, he was a director and senior fellow of the Japan Institute of International Affairs, Tokyo, where he was the founding editor of JIIA Commentary, an English language online journal. Prior to that, he was the director of the Center of Asian Studies at American University, Washington DC, where he designed the world's first dual-degree program with Ritsumeikan University in Kyoto. He has been an advanced research fellow at Harvard, MacArthur Foundation fellow in international peace and security at Princeton, and visiting fellow at Tokyo University. Dr. Tamamoto was born in Tokyo and educated in Japan, Switzerland, Egypt and the United States. He graduated from Brown University and holds a Ph.D. in international relations from Johns Hopkins University.

ALL ARE WELCOME

For further information, contact:

Dr John Swenson-Wright
Lecturer in Japanese Politics and International Relations
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies
Telephone: +44(0)1223 335152
Email: jhs22@cam.ac.uk

Barak Kushner, PhD
Lecturer in Modern Japanese History
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies
Telephone: +44(0)1223 335174
Email: bk284@cam.ac.uk


Poetry Untamed: A Postnationalist Approach to Ancient East Asian Literature

Wednesday, 23rd January, 2008 at 5pm in the Common Room,
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies, Sidgwick Avenue, Cambridge.

The University of Cambridge Department of East Asian Studies presents an East Asia Institute seminar:

Poetry Untamed: A Postnationalist Approach to Ancient East Asian Literature

To be given by: Dr Jason Webb, University of Tokyo

Dr. Jason Webb received his Ph.D. in 2005 from the Department of Comparative Literature of Princeton University. His current research focuses on Man'y�sh�, Kaif�s�, and the broader problem of textual reception during the seventh and eighth centuries, topics he is treating in a book manuscript entitled Postnationalism and the Problem of Reception in Early Yamato. Jason is on the faculty of the Institute of Oriental Culture (T�y� Bunka Kenky�jo) of the University of Tokyo and serves as co-Managing Editor of the International Journal of Asian Studies, a biannual journal published jointly by the University of Tokyo and Cambridge UP.

ALL ARE WELCOME

For further information, contact:

Dr John Swenson-Wright
Lecturer in Japanese Politics and International Relations
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies
Telephone: +44(0)1223 335152
Email: jhs22@cam.ac.uk

Barak Kushner, PhD
Lecturer in Modern Japanese History
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies
Telephone: +44(0)1223 335174
Email: bk284@cam.ac.uk


Locality and Belonging in Early Ming China: The Tale of Lady Tan

Monday, 21st January, 2008 at 5pm in the Common Room,
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies, Sidgwick Avenue, Cambridge.

The University of Cambridge Department of East Asian Studies presents an East Asia Institute seminar:

Locality and Belonging in Early Ming China: The Tale of Lady Tan

To be given by: Dr Anne Gerritsen, Warwick University

Dr. Anne Gerritsen was an undergraduate in Chinese Studies at Leiden University, with a one-year excursion to Cambridge. She completed her Harvard PhD in 2001, and her book, entitled Ji'an Literati and the Local in Song-Yuan-Ming China, was published by Brill in 2007. She is starting a new project that compares Ji'an to the porcelain city of Jingdezhen. Since 2001, she teaches in the History Department at Warwick University.

ALL ARE WELCOME

For further information, contact:

Dr John Swenson-Wright
Lecturer in Japanese Politics and International Relations
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies
Telephone: +44(0)1223 335152
Email: jhs22@cam.ac.uk

Barak Kushner, PhD
Lecturer in Modern Japanese History
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies
Telephone: +44(0)1223 335174
Email: bk284@cam.ac.uk


Michaelmas 2007

Talk by Her Excellency, Madame Fu Ying -
Chinese Ambassador to the United Kingdom

The First Emporer's tomb and Sima Qian - an archaeological enquiry

Monday, 26th November, 2007 at 5pm in the Common Room
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies, Sidgwick Avenue, Cambridge

The University of Cambridge Department of East Asian Studies presents
an Interdisciplinary Asian Studies seminar:

The First Emperor's tomb and Sima Qian - an archaeological inquiry

To be given by: Dr Lukas Nickel, School of Oriental & African Studies, University of London

After studying Sinology, Oriental Archaeology and East Asian Art History in Berlin, Halle and Heidelberg, Lukas Nickel worked from 1999 he worked at the Museum of East Asian Art in Cologne. In 2001 Lukas Nickel became research and teaching assistant for Chinese archaeology at Zurich University, where he taught on early imperial material culture of China, early Buddhist art and traditional architecture of East Asia. In Zurich he prepared the exhibition and the catalogue Return of the Buddha for the Museum Rietberg, the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin and the Royal Academy in London. The exhibition was later on view at the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery in Washington, D.C. Beginning in 2002, Lukas Nickel organized a joint Swiss-Chinese excavation of a Buddhist temple site in Shandong province. Since 2004 Lukas holds a joint position as Lecturer in Chinese Archaeology at SOAS and the Institute of Archaeology, UCL, where he teaches on early imperial China and on the archaeology of the Silk Road. More recently he worked on ancient Chinese bronze casting techniques and pursued replication experiments. He is also contributing to the activities around the British Museum exhibition The First Emperor - China's Terracotta Army.

ALL ARE WELCOME

For further information, contact:

Dr John Swenson-Wright
Lecturer in Japanese Politics and International Relations
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies
Telephone: +44(0)1223 335152
Email: jhs22@cam.ac.uk

Barak Kushner, PhD
Lecturer in Modern Japanese History
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies
Telephone: +44(0)1223 335174
Email: bk284@cam.ac.uk


Taiwan's Mainlanders' identity crisis and adaptation under the Presidency of Chen Shui-bian

Monday, 19th November, 2007 at 5pm in the Common Room
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies, Sidgwick Avenue, Cambridge

The University of Cambridge Department of East Asian Studies presents
an Interdisciplinary Asian Studies seminar:

Taiwan's Mainlanders' identity crisis and adaptation under the Presidency of Chen Shui-bian

To be given by: Dr Stephane Corcuff, University of Lyons, France

Dr. Stephane Corcuff is an Associate Professor of political science at Lyons Institute of Political Studies, and a researcher at the Ecole Normale Sup�rieure's Institute of East Asia, Lyons. He received his PhD in Political Science from the Paris Institute of Political Studies (Sciences-Po). Dr. Corcuff served as press attaché of the French Institute in Taipei and as director of the Professional Master in Asian Business, University Lyon 2. He was the editor of, Memories of the Future: National Identity Issues and the Search for a New Taiwan (2002), and the author of a Chinese language essay on Taiwan's Mainlanders, Fenghe rinuan: Taiwan Waishengren yu guojia rentong de zhuanbian (2004).

ALL ARE WELCOME

For further information, contact:

Dr John Swenson-Wright
Lecturer in Japanese Politics and International Relations
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies
Telephone: +44(0)1223 335152
Email: jhs22@cam.ac.uk

Barak Kushner, PhD
Lecturer in Modern Japanese History
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies
Telephone: +44(0)1223 335174
Email: bk284@cam.ac.uk


Chinese media concepts in a historical perspective

Monday, 12th November, 2007 at 5pm in the Common Room
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies, Sidgwick Avenue, Cambridge

The University of Cambridge Department of East Asian Studies presents
an Interdisciplinary Asian Studies seminar:

Chinese media concepts in a historical perspective

To be given by: Professor Natascha Gentz, University of Edinburgh

Professor Natascha Gentz is Chair of Chinese at the University of Edinburgh since May 2006. Her publications include a monograph on the history Chinese journalism and two edited volumes, one on transcultural knowledge transfer in Late Qing China, the other one on how global media are shaping cultural identities. She has also published a book on contemporary Chinese historical drama as well as dozens of articles on Late Qing and contemporary Chinese drama, literature and media, and has translated a volume of short stories and a novel from Gao Xingjian.

ALL ARE WELCOME

For further information, contact:

Dr John Swenson-Wright
Lecturer in Japanese Politics and International Relations
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies
Telephone: +44(0)1223 335152
Email: jhs22@cam.ac.uk

Barak Kushner, PhD
Lecturer in Modern Japanese History
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies
Telephone: +44(0)1223 335174
Email: bk284@cam.ac.uk


Reactionary Dissent in Late Warring States China:
Situating the 'Primitivist' Layer in Laozi and Zhuangzi

Monday, 5th November, 2007 at 5pm in the Common Room
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies, Sidgwick Avenue, Cambridge

The University of Cambridge Department of East Asian Studies presents
an Interdisciplinary Asian Studies seminar:

Reactionary Dissent in Late Warring States China: Situating the 'Primitivist' Layer in Laozi and Zhuangzi

To be given by: Dr Antonello Palumbo
School of Oriental & African Studies, University of London

Antonello Palumbo is Lecturer in Chinese Religions at the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London. He has written on various aspects of the ideological history of ancient and medieval China, such as polemics between Buddhists and Taoists, religious propaganda, Buddhist bibliographies and Chinese translations of Manichaean texts from Central Asia. His current work includes a monograph in progress on the book of Laozi and the origins of Taoism in early imperial China.

ALL ARE WELCOME

For further information, contact:

Dr John Swenson-Wright
Lecturer in Japanese Politics and International Relations
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies
Telephone: +44(0)1223 335152
Email: jhs22@cam.ac.uk

Barak Kushner, PhD
Lecturer in Modern Japanese History
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies
Telephone: +44(0)1223 335174
Email: bk284@cam.ac.uk


Contesting good taste, shaping Japanese bodies:
The department store MITSUKOSHI and modern identities

Monday, 29th October, 2007 at 5pm in the Common Room
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies, Sidgwick Avenue, Cambridge

The University of Cambridge Department of East Asian Studies presents
an Interdisciplinary Asian Studies seminar:

Contesting good taste, shaping Japanese bodies:
The department store MITSUKOSHI and modern identities

To be given by: Professor Dr Steffi Richter, Institute of East Asian Studies, Universit�t Leipzig

Steffi Richter is Professor of Japanese Studies and Director of the Institute of East Asian Studies at the University of Leipzig. She was first trained in philosophy at Lomonossov-University in Moscow with a specialization in the philosophy of science. In 1982 she won a Ph.D. scholarship from the Japanese Ministry of Education that resulted in her 1985 dissertation on Nishida Kitaro. Before taking up the chair in Leipzig in 1996, Steffi Richter was an Associate Professor for Comparative Cultural Studies at T�ky� University. Her present research focuses on nationalism and historical revisionism in East Asia as well as on the relationship between consumer culture and identity formation in modern and contemporary Japan. Her publications include a book on scientific thought in Japan (Ent-Zweiung. Wissenschaftliches Denken in Japan zwischen Tradition und Moderne; Berlin, 1994) and numerous articles in German. Her English articles include "Staging Good Taste, Staging 'Japaneseness': Consumer Culture, the Department Store Mitsukoshi and Performance of Modern Identities in Japan" (Asiatische Studien LVIII, 3/2004) and "The History Textbook Controversy as an indicator of National Self-Reflection" (In: Gesine Foljanty-Jost, ed., Japan in the 1990s: Crisis as an Impetus for Change [M�nster, 2004]). She also has co-edited a volume on Reading Manga: Local and Global Perceptions of Japanese Comics (Leipzig, 2006).

ALL ARE WELCOME

For further information, contact:

Dr John Swenson-Wright
Lecturer in Japanese Politics and International Relations
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies
Telephone: +44(0)1223 335152
Email: jhs22@cam.ac.uk

Barak Kushner, PhD
Lecturer in Modern Japanese History
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies
Telephone: +44(0)1223 335174
Email: bk284@cam.ac.uk


Chinese printed illustrations around 1600:
additional notes on Xixiang ji and Pipa ji

Monday, 22nd October, 2007 at 5pm in the Common Room
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies, Sidgwick Avenue, Cambridge

The University of Cambridge Department of East Asian Studies presents
an Interdisciplinary Asian Studies seminar:

Chinese printed illustrations around 1600:
additional notes on Xixiang ji and Pipa ji

To be given by: Dr Michela Bussotti,
EFEO, French school of Oriental Studies in Paris

Dr. Michela Bussotti is a lecturer at EFEO, French school of Oriental Studies in Paris. She received her doctorate from the �cole Pratique des Hautes �tudes, IVth section (Historical and Philological Studies). Appointed at the Peking Centre of the EFEO during 2001-2006, she is now a lecturer in Paris. Interested in the intellectual and material culture of late imperial China, she is working on the history of books and illustrations. Her book, Gravures de Hui (Hui school woodcuts, published by EFEO in 2001), was awarded the "Stanislas Julien" prize by the Acad�mie des Inscriptions et Belles-Lettres (2003).

ALL ARE WELCOME

For further information, contact:

Dr John Swenson-Wright
Lecturer in Japanese Politics and International Relations
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies
Telephone: +44(0)1223 335152
Email: jhs22@cam.ac.uk

Barak Kushner, PhD
Lecturer in Modern Japanese History
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies
Telephone: +44(0)1223 335174
Email: bk284@cam.ac.uk


Towards a History of Natural Disasters in China:
the Case of Linfen county (Shanxi)

Monday, 15th October, 2007 at 5pm in the Common Room
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies, Sidgwick Avenue, Cambridge

The University of Cambridge Department of East Asian Studies presents
an Interdisciplinary Asian Studies seminar:

Towards a History of Natural Disasters in China:
the Case of Linfen county (Shanxi)

To be given by: Dr Andrea Janku, School of Oriental & African Studies, University of London

Dr. Andrea Janku is a lecturer for the History of China at SOAS. She completed her Ph.D. on political editorials in the late Qing press in Heidelberg. This was part of a larger project on the development of a modern public sphere in late imperial and modern China. After completion of her Ph.D. she held a position as an assistant professor (Classical Sinology) at the Institute of Chinese Studies in Heidelberg. Dr. Janku's current interests include the environmental history of China, the history of famine, and the history of social and political communication. Her publications include a monograph, Nur leere Reden: Politischer Diskurs und die Shanghaier Presse im China des sp�ten 19. Jahrhunderts* (Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 2003); and many articles, including: "Preparing the Ground for Revolutionary Discourse: From the Jingshiwen Compilations to Journalistic Writings in Nineteenth Century China," T'oung Pao 90 (2004.1-3); "Sowing Happiness: Spiritual Competition in Famine Relief activities in Late Nineteenth Century China," Minsu quyi, No. 143 (March 2004), special issue on "Disasters and Religion," edited by Paul Katz. Another article, "Heaven-sent Disasters in Late imperial China: the Scope of the State and Beyond." In Christian Pfister and Christoph Mauch, eds. Natural Disasters, Cultural Responses: a World History, is forthcoming.

ALL ARE WELCOME

For further information, contact:

Dr John Swenson-Wright
Lecturer in Japanese Politics and International Relations
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies
Telephone: +44(0)1223 335152
Email: jhs22@cam.ac.uk

Barak Kushner, PhD
Lecturer in Modern Japanese History
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies
Telephone: +44(0)1223 335174
Email: bk284@cam.ac.uk


Client State: Japan in the American Embrace

Thursday, 4th October, 2007 at 5pm in Room 13
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies, Sidgwick Avenue, Cambridge

The University of Cambridge Department of East Asian Studies presents
an Interdisciplinary Asian Studies seminar:

Client State: Japan in the American Embrace

To be given by: Prof. Gavan McCormack, Australian National University

Gavan McCormack is Emeritus Professor in the Research School of Pacific and Asian Studies, Australian National University, Canberra. His books include The Emptiness of Japanese Affluence, and most recently Client State: Japan in the American Embrace (Verso, 2007), which the publisher notes is:

"...an extraordinary documentation of Japan's history and current submission to American policy at the loss of tradition, free speech, neighboring allies and national consciousness in favor of military defense, government corruption and growing involvement in US global imperialism. This chilling work masterfully narrates a story of submission, corruption and the startling decline of Japan's impressive economy, which has recently left over 1 million Japanese families on welfare and another 2 million in need."

ALL ARE WELCOME

For further information, contact:

Dr John Swenson-Wright
Lecturer in Japanese Politics and International Relations
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies
Telephone: +44(0)1223 335152
Email: jhs22@cam.ac.uk

Barak Kushner, PhD
Lecturer in Modern Japanese History
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies
Telephone: +44(0)1223 335174
Email: bk284@cam.ac.uk


Personalized choices: redrawing the boundaries of families and everyday life under neoliberal reform in Japan

Monday, 8th October, 2007 at 5pm in the Common Room
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies, Sidgwick Avenue, Cambridge

The University of Cambridge Department of East Asian Studies presents
an Interdisciplinary Asian Studies seminar:

Personalized choices: redrawing the boundaries of families and everyday life under neoliberal reform in Japan

To be given by: Dr Hiroko Takeda, University of Sheffield

Dr. Hiroko Takeda is Lecturer in Japanese Studies in the School of East Asian Studies, University of Sheffield and Research Director of the cluster on Social Change and Transition in East Asia at the National Institute of Japanese Studies. She completed her PhD at the School of East Asian Studies, University of Sheffield, and after having taught at Cardiff University, returned to the School. She specializes in political sociology and her research interests include gender and politics/political economy in Japan and East Asia, social and political theories, biopolitics and governance, political discourse analysis and the political function of the discourse of 'risk'. Recent publication includes: The Political Economy of Reproduction in Japan: Between Nation-State and Everyday Life (RoutledgeCurzon, 2005); and a co-authored article with Glenn D. Hook, '"Self-responsibility" and the Nature of the Postwar Japanese State: Risk through the Looking Glass', Journal of Japanese Studies, Vol. 33, No. 1 (2007).

ALL ARE WELCOME

For further information, contact:

Dr John Swenson-Wright
Lecturer in Japanese Politics and International Relations
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies
Telephone: +44(0)1223 335152
Email: jhs22@cam.ac.uk

Barak Kushner, PhD
Lecturer in Modern Japanese History
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies
Telephone: +44(0)1223 335174
Email: bk284@cam.ac.uk


Choi Jin Kayagum Recital - Traditional Sounds from Korea at Clare Hall

Interdisciplinary Asian Studies - Seminar Programme - Michaelmas Term 2007

The University of Cambridge Department of East Asian Studies is pleased to announce the programme for its Michaelmas Term series of Interdisciplinary Asian Studies seminars. The seminars will be held at 5.00pm in the Common Room of the Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies, Sidgwick Avenue.

ALL ARE WELCOME

Thursday, 4th October, 2007 (please note: this seminar is in addition to the regular sequence of Mondays and takes place in Room 13)
Client State: Japan in the American Embrace
Professor Gavan McCormack, Australian National University

Monday, 8th October, 2007
Personalized choices: redrawing the boundaries of families and everyday life under neoliberal reform in Japan
Dr Hiroko Takeda, University of Sheffield

Monday, 15th October, 2007
Towards a History of Natural Disasters in China:
the Case of Linfen county (Shanxi)

Dr Andrea Janku, School of Oriental & African Studies, University of London

Monday, 22nd October, 2007
Chinese printed illustrations around 1600:
additional notes on Xixiang ji and Pipa ji

Dr Michela Bussotti, EFEO, French School of Oriental Studies, Paris

Monday, 29th October, 2007
Contesting good taste, shaping Japanese bodies:
The department store MITSUKOSHI and modern identities

Professor Dr Steffi Richter, Institute of East Asian Studies, Universit�t Leipzig

Monday, 5th November, 2007
Reactionary Dissent in Late Warring States China:
Situating the 'Primitivist' Layer in Laozi and Zhuangzi

Dr Antonello Palumbo, School of Oriental & African Studies, University of London

Monday, 12th November, 2007
Chinese media concepts in a historical perspective
Professor Natascha Gentz, University of Edinburgh

Monday, 19th November, 2007
Taiwan's Mainlanders' identity crisis and adaptation under the Presidency of Chen Shui-bian
Dr Stephane Corcuff, University of Lyons, France

Monday, 26th November, 2007
The First Emperor's tomb and Sima Qian - an archaeological inquiry
Dr Lukas Nickel, School of Oriental & African Studies, University of London

For further information, contact:

Dr John Swenson-Wright
Lecturer in Japanese Politics and International Relations
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies
Telephone: +44(0)1223 335152
Email: jhs22@cam.ac.uk

Barak Kushner, PhD
Lecturer in Modern Japanese History
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies
Telephone: +44(0)1223 335174
Email: bk284@cam.ac.uk


China and Empire: weekly public lecture series - Michaelmas Term 2007

The University of Cambridge Department of East Asian Studies is pleased to announce the programme for its series of public lectures under the general title "China and Empire". Lectures will be held on Thursdays throughout the Michaelmas Term at 5.00pm in the Little Hall, on the University's Sidgwick Site, Sidgwick Avenue.

ALL ARE WELCOME

Thursday, 11th October, 2007
The Qin empire and its achievement
Dr Michael Loewe, Clare Hall,Cambridge

Thursday, 18th October, 2007
The First Emperor exhibition at the British Museum
Ms Jane Portal, British Museum, London

Thursday, 25th October, 2007
Emperor and subject in China
Dr Joe McDermott, East Asian Studies, University of Cambridge

Thursday, 1st November, 2007
Writing, script and empire in early China
Prof. Roel Sterckx, East Asian Studies, University of Cambridge

Thursday, 8th November, 2007
Calling back the soul: tombs and death ritual in the early Chinese empire
Dr Thomas Jansen, East Asian Studies, University of Cambridge

Thursday, 15th November, 2007
Tombs after the unification of China
Dr James Lin, Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge

Thursday, 22nd November, 2007
Celestial software: numbers and the power of the early Chinese empire
Dr Christopher Cullen, Needham Research Institute, Cambridge

For further information, contact:

Department of East Asian Studies
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies
Sidgwick Avenue, Cambridge, CB3 9DA
Telephone: +44(0)1223-335106
Fax: +44(0)1223-335110


Israeli Film Club - Michaelmas Term 2007

Films are shown on Mondays, from 1:15pm, in room L1 (basement lecture theatre) at the Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies, Sidgwick Avenue.

ALL ARE WELCOME

All films are Israeli and are in Hebrew with English subtitles.

15 October Sh'chur Smuel Hasfari, 1994 (? mins)
22 October Someone to Run With Oded Davidov, 2006 (118 mins)
29 October Out of Sight Daniel Sykrin, 2000 (90 mins)
5 November Nina's Tragedies Shebi Gabizon, 2003 (106 mins)
12 November Bonjour Monsieur Shlomi (Shlomi's Stars) Shemi Zarhin, 2003 (95 mins)
19 November Broken Wings Nir Bergman, 2002 (87 mins)
26 November Sweet Mud Dror Shaul, 2005 (90 mins)

 


Centre for Modern Hebrew Studies Lecture - Being Mzrahi: the predicament and paradox of Israel's Internal Others?

Wednesday, 14th November, 2007 at 5pm in Room 8 at the
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies, Sidgwick Avenue, Cambridge

The University of Cambridge Centre for Modern Hebrew Studies presents a lecture:

Being Mzrahi: the predicament and paradox of Israel's Internal Others?

To be given by: Tilde Rosmer, University of Oslo

ALL ARE WELCOME

For further information contact:

Mrs Rachel Williams
Centre for Modern Hebrew Studies
Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies
Telephone: +44(0)1223-335134
Email: rw212@cam.ac.uk


Needham Research Institute - Text Reading Seminars - Michaelmas Term 2007

Friday, 12th October, 2007:
Orthodox and unorthodox views of embryonic development in Song Dynasty medicine
Daniel Trambaiolo, University of Cambridge

Friday, 19th October, 2007:
Confucius meets Xiang Tuo: A transformation text (bianwen) from Dunhuang
Oliver Weingarten, University of Cambridge

Friday, 26th October, 2007:
Did Zhang Heng consult the Yijing?
Margaret Pearson, Skidmore College

Friday, 2nd November, 2007:
Understanding jiaoqi: historical disease as contested object of knowledge
Hilary Smith, University of Pennsylvania

Friday, 9th November, 2007:
Adoption or inheritance; a legal case of 330 CE
Michael Loewe, Clare Hall, Cambridge

Friday, 16th November, 2007:
Hygiene as science and ritual: Transformation through cleanliness in the Xiao xue
Jennifer Oldstone-Moore, Wittenburg University

Friday, 23rd November, 2007:
Marble movers of the Ming: He Zhongshi's Lianggong dingjian ji and the construction of the Forbidden City
Sally Church, Wolfson College, Cambridge

The seminars are held at 3.30 p.m. at the Needham Research Institute.

ALL WELCOME

The Needham Research Institute is situated at the corner of Sylvester and Herschel Roads, behind Robinson College.

Any queries about the seminars should be directed to:

John P.C. Moffett, Librarian
East Asian History of Science Library
Needham Research Institute
8 Sylvester Road
Cambridge CB3 9AF, UK

Email: jm10019@cam.ac.uk
Phone: +44(0)1223-311545 ex.223
Website: www.nri.org.uk


Ancient India & Iran Trust Lectures - Michaelmas Term 2007


Faculty of History - Comparative Social and Cultural History Seminar
Michaelmas Term 2007 - "Consumption"


Faculty of History - World History Seminar - Michaelmas Term 2007


Mongolia & Inner Asia Studies Unit - Research Seminars -
Michaelmas Term 2007


Summer, 2007

Summer Hebrew Ulpan for University Students

Centre for Modern Hebrew Studies Ulpan 2007