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L2 acquisition of Chinese and Thai nominal phrases

Research Seminars on Chinese Linguistics & Chinese as a Second Language

Lent Term, 2017

LogoThe Research Seminars on Chinese Linguistics and Chinese as a Second Language ("L2 Chinese") are held by the L2 Chinese research group of the Faculty of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies. The aim of these seminars is to provide a platform for researchers to discuss recent developments in the field, to present their work and to receive feedback from fellow researchers. The seminars are supervised by Dr Boping Yuan.

All are welcome!

  • Friday, 10th February, 2017 in Room 7 at the Faculty
    L2 acquisition of Chinese and Thai nominal phrases
    Woramon Prawatmuang


In my PhD project, I investigate roles of L1 features, positive evidence and interface on L2 acquisition, using data from an empirical study regarding L2 acquisition of Chinese and Thai nominal phrases.

In previous presentations, I have presented linguistic background and methodology of my study, as well as some results. In this presentation, I will continue with results of the study, both an acceptability judgment task and a self-paced reading task.

In general, results from these tasks indicate that:

1) It is more likely that learners will successfully acquire a target language feature when learners’ L1 and target language features are the same, compared to when the two features are different.

2) However, the L1 positive transfer effect is not absolute. The fact that L1 and target language features are the same does not always guarantee that learners can behave native-like under all criteria.

3) It is more likely that learners will successfully acquire a target language feature when positive evidence in a target language is available, compared to when the input is not available.

4) Linguistic phenomena that have interface properties may be acquired later than those which have narrow-syntax properties.


For further information, contact:

Ruyi Dai
PhD Student, Chinese Studies
Department of East Asian Studies