skip to content

Faculty of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies

 
Venue: 
Emmanuel College Cambridge
Event date: 
Monday, 6 August, 2018 (All day) to Saturday, 18 August, 2018 (All day)
Speakers: 
Event organiser: 

 

Applications for 2018 are now closed.

Our sustained work in teaching what we call holistic wahon literacy  総合的な和本リテラシー  has resulted in a programme that works very effectively.

In the seventy-two hours of tuition that we offer, we devote roughly the same amount of hours to the three linguistic/palaeographic areas of wabun in cursive (kuzushiji and hentaigana), kanbun in non-cursive and sōrōbun in cursive. The programme also includes sessions with the London-based calligraphy master Yukiko Ayres. These sessions, specially designed to enhance your reading abilities by writing cursive kanji and kana, have proved to be very helpful. Lectures from specialists in the areas of textual bibliography and palaeography complement the core tuition. The theme of this year summer school is Daily life in Edo-period Japan  江戸時代の庶民生活.

It is more and more the case that positions at academic institutions, libraries and museums require palaeographic knowledge at some level. Our Graduate Summer School is designed to provide you with the skills necessary to tackle a wide range of early-modern primary sources in their original format by yourself and, therefore, to be competitive in this kind of job opportunities.

With us:

  • You become familiar with the variety of palaeographic challenges that characterize the wide range of Edo-period primary sources.
  • You learn effective techniques to master kuzushiji and hentaigana.
  • You gain a firm grasp of how cursive sōrōbun works in archival materials and develop strategies to decode these texts.
  • You are exposed to the importance of kanbun in reading Edo-period sources and learn specific ways to read these sources.
  • You are encouraged to identify research topics in the area of Japanese early-modern palaeography.