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Laura Moretti runs the Fourth Graduate Summer School in Japanese Early-modern Palaeography

last modified Aug 18, 2017 02:14 PM

Once again this year Cambridge is at the forefront of work on early-modern palaeography, hosting the fourth Graduate Summer School that teaches all the skills needed in order to access, decode and interpret Edo-period printed and handwritten materials. Dr Laura Moretti, University Lecturer in Pre-modern Japanese Studies, Prof Yamabe Susumu (Nishogakusha University) and London-based calligraphy master Yukiko Ayres are welcoming 28 trainees this year, including graduate students, librarians, museum curators and scholars from ten countries and from a variety of institutions including Ivy-league universities.

Palaeography Summer School 2017

The programme focusses on primary sources that deal with daily-life in Edo-period Japan, teaching how to read cursive early-modern Japanese and much more. This year the programme also features two lectures by scholars who work on Western palaeography at the University of Cambridge (Prof Paul Russell and Dr Teresa Webber), with a view to foster creative thinking around research projects in the area of Japanese early-modern palaeography.

Participants will also work on the transcription and translation of selected materials kept at the Cambridge University Library. The results of this special project will be made widely available on the webpage of the Japanese Digital Collection of the University Library. For more details about the Fourth Graduate Summer School please visit: www.wakancambridge.com.

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Cambridge has a long and distinctive tradition in the study of the Middle East and Asia. This Faculty prides itself on exploring these fields through the local languages and encourages students to learn through real world engagement. If you are interested in these world regions and want to discover their languages, cultures, histories, religions, and politics, then this is the home for you. 

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